Beware of biological variability in your *-Seq experiments

From this excellent paper on biological variability in RNA-Seq experiments (bold highlights are mine):

“Biological variability has important implications for the design, analysis and interpretation of RNA-sequencing experiments. […] If only a few biological replicates are available, it will be impossible to estimate the level of biological variability in expression for each gene in a study. Supplementary Table 1 summarizes a large number of published RNA-sequencing studies over the past three years. In every case, except for the two studies we analyzed here, conclusions were based on a small number (n ≤ 2) of biological replicates. One goal of RNA-sequencing studies may be simply to identify and catalog expression of new or alternative transcripts. However, all of these studies make broader biological statements on the basis of a very small set of biological replicates.

Our analysis has two important implications for studies performed with a small number of biological replicates. First, significant results in these studies may be due to biological variation and may not be reproducible; and second, it is impossible to know whether expression patterns are specific to the individuals in the study or are a characteristic of the study populations. These ideas are now widely accepted for DNA microarray experiments, where a large number of biological replicates are now required to justify scientific conclusions. Our analysis suggests that as biological variability is a fundamental characteristic of gene expression, sequencing experiments should be subject to similar requirements.”

If you are doing RNA-Seq, be very vigilant in your experimental design and find a way to incorporate more replicates, even at the expense of testing fewer comparisons.   It’s better to test one comparison (tissue X vs. Y, for example) with 5 or more replicates than to test three comparisons (Tissue X vs. Y, Y vs. Z, and X vx Z) with only 2 replicates for each tissue type.

 

Create a volcano plot on EBSeq output

The differential expression analysis program EBSeq produces a number of data objects as part of the workflow, but there aren’t many options for visualization of the data.

The authors suggest the use of heatmap.2 in R:

heatmap.2(NormalizedMatrix[GenesOfInterest,], scale=”row”, trace=”none”, Colv=F)

However, this depends on knowing ahead of time your genes of interest.  It is not practical to generate a heatmap with hundreds or thousands of DE genes.

I wanted to produce something approximating a volcano plot for EBSeq results.  What I came up with initially was the following:

A pseudo-volcano plot for EBSeq results.  The y-axis is posterior probability of differential expression (PPDE).
A pseudo-volcano plot for EBSeq results. The y-axis is posterior probability of differential expression (PPDE).

To make this plot, I had to grab some data arrays from the large object “EBOut” that is produced by calling the “EBTest” method and from the “GeneFC” object as below:

The “abline” command places a horizontal line where the PPDE is equal to or greater than 95%.  This would be equivalent to an FDR of 0.05.

If you want to inspect the plot interactively in R to identify gene names above the threshold and/or with large posterior fold changes you would use:

To make it look more like a canonical volcano plot, I then tried:

Creating the following plot:

Fig 2.  Log(2) Fold Change on the X-axis.
Fig 2. Log(2) Fold Change on the X-axis.

This is good, except I want to subset the data and add colors. To do this I need to create a new dataframe from the EBOut$PPDE and GeneFC$PostFC objects:

With everything in one dataframe, plotting and subsetting the data is easier. Inspired by this post at Stephen Turner’s “Getting Genetics Done” blog, I prepared my final colored volcano plot as follows:

The final plot looks like this:

Fig 3.  The final plot, with colored points for the DE genes, and higher fold change indicated with red.
Fig 3. The final plot, with colored points for the DE genes, and higher fold change indicated with red.